Wolf Hollow News

Open House April 6th

Wolf Hollow Open House

Saturday April 6th 11-3pm

Come and tour the facility, meet staff, board members and volunteers, and learn more about the work we do.

We have very limited parking space at Wolf Hollow, so San Juan Transit has very generously offered to provide a free shuttle bus between Friday Harbor and Wolf Hollow.

For more information and the shuttle bus schedule, visit our Events section

We look forward to seeing you!

Meet our New Rehab Staff Member

We welcomed Megan Perry to our staff team in January 2019.
Megan first visited San Juan Island in 2010 for an internship with Wolf Hollow. The experience sparked her interest in wildlife rehabilitation, and she returned in the summers of 2013 and 2017  as our seasonal Wildlife Rehabilitator. She graduated with a BA in Human Development from Long Beach State University in 2009, and returned to school to earn her AS in Veterinary Technology from Carrington College, California in 2015. She holds a Veterinary Technician’s license in both California and Washington State, and has worked at several veterinary hospitals. As a staff rehabilitator, Megan will be involved in all aspects of animal care, and in training and supervising rehab staff, interns and volunteers.

Madrona has a New Home

Madrona, a Red-tailed Hawk, is one of our unreleasable education birds. She has been with us for over 20 years and has made numerous appearances at presentations and children’s activities in the local area. Volunteers built her a nice enclosure when she first arrived, but, over the years, our damp climate had taken its toll and the cage was starting to fall apart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to funding provided by the ANDAH Foundation, our Facilities Manager Mark Billington and volunteer Jerry McElyea were able to take down the old cage and build her a beautiful new enclosure. It is 24 feet long and 8 feet high to give her plenty of space to move around, and a choice of perches so she can sit in the sun and watch what’s going on, or take shelter from the wind and rain.

Student Leads Guided Walk

As his community project, local student Merritt DeShon decided to lead a guided walk up Mt Young and invite participants to make donations to support Wolf Hollow’s work. The weather didn’t cooperate, but we all had fun, and learned all kinds of interesting facts about local plants and animals from our knowledgeable guide.

Our thanks to Merritt for all the time and effort he put into gathering information and perfecting his guided walk, and to everyone who braved the rain to take part. We were delighted to receive $590 in donations from walk participants. Thank You!

 

Welcome our New Executive Director

Chanda Stone joined Wolf Hollow as Executive Director in September 2018.

A native of southern California, Chanda has many years of experience as an arborist, wetland restoration coordinator and volunteer specialist. She earned a graduate degree from Portland State University and created TEAM Tualatin, a summer program for teens to restore natural wildlife habitats. Volunteering in the community is her passion. Chanda is a past board president for Nursing Mother’s Council of Oregon, a Girl Scout Leader, and she currently serves on the board of the Friday Harbor Film Festival.

Chanda moved with her husband and two children to San Juan Island in 2017 after living and working for five years in Saudi Arabia. Having traveled the world, she and her family feel lucky to now call San Juan Island their forever home.

Otters Released

After 4 months of care at Wolf Hollow, four young otters were released on the shores of a sheltered bay. They ran along the shore, investigated the rocks and seaweed, explored the driftwood and splashed in and out of the water.

When they arrived at Wolf Hollow in June and early July the kits were about 3 months old and had been orphaned or become separated from their mothers. Each was found alone in a different place, but they quickly became inseparable and swam together, fell asleep on top of each other and learned how to catch live fish and crabs.  By fall they were well grown and ready to tackle life in the wild.